Bookworm Camp Day 3

We had another book-filled day at bookworm camp!  We continued talking about Breadcrumbs this morning and had a great conversation about Hazel and Jack. It led to researching Montessori schools, forest kindergarten, school closings in Minnesota, Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Hans Christian Anderson, and age-appropriate behavior. We talked for close to an hour! Then we watched Pixar’s “The Little Match Girl” short from a few years ago.

After that, we dove into learning about how books go from an idea in someone’s head to the printed book in the bookstore. We talked about agents and slush piles, editors and publishing houses. Then I shared Kate Messner’s Revision Gallery presentation with them.  They sat at the tables in amazement as we looked at the revision process through the eyes of real authors.  None of the campers had any idea that authors spend months revising their work. And they felt better about their own writing when they saw the grammar edits and “show don’t tell” comments on many of the drafts.  I can’t thank Kate enough for the presentation because it is always enlightening for my kids.

Once again, we read  30 pages of Liar & Spy before lunch.  I can’t recommend it enough. It’s a great read aloud for middle school students!

After lunch, we spent an hour reading our own books.  It was absolutely glorious.  When I announced that it was time to move on, they actually groaned!  It’s a dream spending time with students who love reading this much!

Finally, we watched most of Chip Kidd’s TED talk, “Designing Books is No Laughing Matter. Ok, It Is“.  (There are no words to describe my love affair with TED talks.) Chip Kidd is a well-known and respected book cover artist and his TED talk is funny and thought-provoking.  The campers really loved it and we had a great conversation about book design afterwards.  I shared this tumblr with them and we discussed redesigning book covers for new generations.  And we took a look at some of Melissa Walker’s Cover Stories to learn about the process behind some of their favorite books.  I think they learned a lot and they really enjoyed it.

Looking forward to continuing with my campers tomorrow.  This week is flying by!

 

Bookworm Camp Starts!

Today was the first day of camp!  I am thrilled to be running a “camp for bookworms” through my local community college.  Last fall I read about Thalia Kid’s Book Club Camp at Symphony Space in New York City.  I was immediately overcome with jealous because that camp sounded like my dream as a kid.  A place to read books and talk about more books?  HEAVEN!

When my local community college campus sent out an email looking for counselors and camp ideas, I decided to throw my idea out there.  A camp for bookworms that would be aimed at middle school students.  To my surprise, they loved the idea!  Then I spent a few months picking three books for the students to read before coming to camp so that we could focus on them during the week of camp.  It was very tough, but I finally chose Mike Mullins’ Ashfall, Anne Ursu’s Breadcrumbs, and Karen Sandler’s Tankborn. My goal was to choose awesome, well-written books that the campers most likely would not have read before.

Today was our first day of camp and it went really well!  I have a small group of students, and an even mix of boys and girls.  They are all entering 7th or 8th grade and they are avid readers.  We started out by introducing ourselves and talking about our book preferences this morning.  I have a paranormal fan, action fan, humor fan, romance, classics, and lots more.  One student is currently reading Sherlock Holmes while another is working on his own novel.  I’m very impressed!  We also had a great discussion about e-readers.  I was surprised to hear that most of the students do not use e-readers, and if they have one it was usually a gift.  Those with gifted e-readers said they use them to read classics or free stories/novels posted in the e-bookstore.  In fact, they were pretty big fans of self-published shorter works.  That’s a first for me!  But they were unanimous in declaring their love for paper books.  E-readers were more of a matter of convenience, used on vacations or while waiting around in places without reading material (usually a phone was used in that case).

We spent today talking about Mike Mullins’ Ashfall, in preparation for s Skype call with him tomorrow morning.  The kids can’t wait to chat to Mike Mullins after our talk today.  We discussed our favorite parts of the books, how we might react in the event of a supervolcano reaction, and other book recommendations for those who enjoyed Mike Mullins’ Ashfall.  After lunch, we watched a 30 minute BBC documentary about the Yellowstone supervolcano so that we all have a good grasp on the scientific possibility of an eruption in the next 50,000 years.  That will give you pause!

I also started a read aloud with my campers today.  I wanted a book that we could definitely finish this week, as I don’t want to leave them hanging once camp ends.  The choice was a no-brainer for me.  Thus, we began to share Liar & Spy by Rebecca Stead today. It went over really well! We are all looking forward to reading more tomorrow.

It was a fantastic day and time flew by.  I am so looking forward to tomorrow! We will be talking to Mike Mullin, reading our books, enjoying a read aloud, watching some book trailers, writing our own post-apocalyptic scenes, and then we will dive into Anne Ursu’s Breadcrumbs for the second half of the day.  It’s going to be a great week!

As we were wrapping up our day, one of the campers raised her hand.  When I looked over, she quietly said, “This if off-topic, but I just want to say how glad I am that I found this camp.  I love to read and not many teachers encourage me. Most of the time they yell at me to stop reading.  So this camp reminded me that it’s ok to read.”

Well, that just about broke my heart.  She went on to tell me that her 3rd grade teacher caught her reading under her desk and marched over to her, tore the book out of her hand, proceeded to yell at her and humiliate her, and tossed the book to the front of the room.  The worst part?  The camper told me, “I wasn’t mad at her for yelling at me, because I guess I was breaking the rules. But I was so mad at her for disrespecting my book and losing my page when she threw the book. I’ve never been able to forgive her for that.”

I was speechless.  All teachers should be encouraging readers, not humiliating them for reading under their desk, looking for more time to read.  It’s one thing to guide a student back to the topic at hand.  Sometimes it just needs to be done.  But to humiliate a young reader?  To throw their book across the room?  To lose their page?  That’s so disrespectful.  Thankfully, this child was a reader and always will be.  But a more reluctant reader, maybe one who just found that perfect book, might be convinced to never pick up a book again after an experience like that.

And that’s why I am thrilled to be running my bookworm camp this summer.  There are lots of readers out there dying for a space where they can share their favorite hobby.  I am happy to provide that for them.  We have four more days of camp and they are going to be amazing!

Book Nerd Book Camp!

I am thrilled to let you all know that this summer I will be facilitating a summer camp for bookworms. I was inspired by Symphony Space’s Thalia Kid’s Book Club Camp, as it sounds like my dream camp.  If I were still a teen, I would have begged my mother to let me go to Symphony Space.  When I realized this, I approached a local community college and asked if they would be interested in hosting our own version.  They said yes and I am in the midst of planning now.

The camp will run for one week for students entering grades seven through nine.  (There will be no more than 20 students in the group).  I am trying to brainstorm 2-3 books to focus on, which the campers will read before camp starts.  I want something fun, that they would not necessarily read in school.  But these are also going to be avid readers, so it can’t be anything that they will have already read on their own.  We figure the camp will be self-selecting, as it will appeal to those who already love to read.  Thus, I am thinking a lot of the kids will be reading at or above grade level.  The choices also need to appeal to boys and girls.  Finally, I am hoping to choose a book by at least one author who is willing to offer a free 20-minute Skype session with the students.  I’m going through catalogs and looking for at least one book that doesn’t come out until this spring/summer, in order to ensure everyone hasn’t read it yet.

But here is where I need help.  What books would you suggest for avid seventh-ninth grade readers to immerse themselves in for a week this summer?  I’ve come up with the following list and would love feedback/suggestions!

The Scorpio Races
The Name of the Star (Shades of London) (I haven’t read this yet- it’s on my TBR pile- so please let me know if you think it isn’t appropriate!)
Black Hole Sun- David Macinnis Gill offers a no-cost Skype visit
Life, After- Sarah Darer Littman also offers a no-cost 20 minute visit. Plus, I love this book!
Cleopatra’s Moon- Another author who offers a no-cost Skype visit. Plus, it’s a cool look at Egyptian history.
Breadcrumbs- Anne Ursu offers a Skype visit. And I love this book. AND I am imagining all I could do with it. An episode of Grimm/Once Upon a Time for comparison? The real Grimm Fairy Tales?

 

What would YOU want to immerse yourself in this summer?  Suggestions more than welcome!  And feel free to recommend upcoming books, too!  I will choose 2-3 for the camp plus at least one for read-aloud.

Last Minute Shopping

I was silly enough to venture to the mall yesterday to pick up a last-minute gift that my mother needed. Needless to say, I have sworn off the mall until after Christmas now! However, I know there are still people out there who have some more gifts to buy. If you are still looking for a gift for a teacher, bookworm, teen, or just that person who has EVERYTHING, may I suggest a gift certificate from Amazon.com? I know I have put this on my list anytime I have been asked what I want for Christmas. Everytime I look at my 15-page Amazon wishlist, I know I can never afford all those books on my own, so I look for gift certificates every chance I get. So for those of you who still have some shopping to do, get a gift certificate!

While at the mall yesterday, I managed to walk around the bookstore with Libba Bray’s Rebel Angels and Anna Godberson’s The Luxe for about 20 minutes. I really, really wanted to buy both of them but shouldn’t be spending the money right now. After wandering the entire store and stopping to read the first few pages of The Luxe (which I loved!), I managed to convince myself to leave them at the bookstore until after Christmas. Hopefully, I can spend some gift card money then and not my own! Eh, who am I kidding? I will definitely buy them, regardless. I just promised not to buy any gifts for myself until after the holidays. :)

Speaking of Libba Bray, I bought A Great and Terrible Beauty months ago. I read the first 100 pages or so, and just couldn’t get into it. I put it aside to read something else and never looked back. Last week I decided to give it another try after seeing blog after blog mentioning the forthcoming release of the third book in the series, The Sweet Far Thing. I picked it up on Monday and….well, I loved it! I couldn’t put the book down this time and need to read the rest of the series as soon as humanly possible. I also shared this story with my class, to show them that sometimes a book just isn’t right for us. However, when we abandon a book it doesn’t mean it won’t be right for us at a later time. It was a great lesson for my class and me!

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